Colombia Supremo Noble Oro De Suarez
Colombia Supremo Noble Oro De Suarez Breakfast Blend Colombia Supremo Noble (Oro De Suarez) Colombia Supremo Noble (Oro De Suarez) Colombia Supremo Noble (Oro De Suarez) Colombia Supremo Noble (Oro De Suarez) Colombia Supremo Noble (Oro De Suarez) Colombia Supremo Noble (Oro De Suarez) Colombia Supremo Noble (Oro De Suarez) Colombia Supremo Noble (Oro De Suarez) Colombia Supremo Noble (Oro De Suarez) Colombia Supremo Noble (Oro De Suarez) Colombia Supremo Noble (Oro De Suarez)
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Coffee profile

Origin Colombia 
Region Cauca
Farmer Catimor, Typica
Variety Cencoic
Process Washed
Roast Medium
Altitude 1,600 masl
Aroma Rich and fruity
Flavour Caramel notes, balanced fruitiness and bittersweet cocoa finish
Body Medium smooth
Acidity Light with hints of blackcurrant
Cupping Score 84.5


 Colombia is a country at the Northern tip of South America and is the second largest Arabica coffee producing Country in the world after Brazil. The West and North harvest times are October/November with the Southern Region producing its main crop April to June. Supremo beans are slightly larger than Excelso beans and are the highest possible quality varietal.
Located to the west of the Central cordillera, Suarez has a great variety of landscapes and cultural resources due to the many rivers cutting through the valleys and mountainsides and the diversity this has created. It has a number of goldmines as well as a gastronomical reputation and produces coffee and cane sugar.
The coffee here is picked by the smallholders with their families and neighbours and generally washed and dried on the farm, often at high altitudes on steep slopes, or brought to a nearby beneficiary for processing. It is then brought to the dry mill or cooperative headquarters for cupping, scoring and sorting for export.
Due to the many microclimates, faces of the slopes, and changing weather patterns, there is often fresh coffee cropping throughout the year, though generally this is split across the main and mitaca (or ‘fly’) crops. Global warming has seen a significant change across Colombia, bringing challenges to some areas and opportunities to others. Earthquakes and landslides have featured in the coffee areas, but the commitment to quality there remains high.

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